Review Draft I | 05.12.2017

DISTURBED MIND

Whether you have experienced it or not, Schizophrenia is real and affects one in a hundred people. Kitchen’s upcoming short film ‘Disturbed mind’ was created to convey the emotions and thoughts of a Schizophrenic patient. Kitchen’s fascination for the illness comes from her past experiences of dealing with this ailment. She speaks of helping a schizophrenic male who turned to alcohol and drugs as a coping mechanism, but despite trying to help, the man did not respond. From her experiences, she found that Schizophrenic persons are misunderstood, hence the making of ‘Disturbed Mind’.

The story is of a Paranoid Schizophrenic, Jacob (Jamie Jordan) who is controlled by the voices in his head. He confides in a psychiatrist (Emily Reeves), of whom stays anonymous throughout the film. However the thing with paranoid Schizophrenia is that the illness alone can fool all of your senses and cause misperceptions, seen throughout Kitchen’s film. A common symptom of a Paranoid Schizophrenic is the delusion of being watched. Much a like the famous Nobel Prize winner John Forbes Nash Jr., leading to the making of Ron Howard’s 2001 ‘A Beautiful Mind’ starring Russell Crowe as the schizophrenic Forbes.

The opening to the film is quite intriguing, it starts with loud music, drinking, bright colours- everything you would not expect a film titled ‘Disturbed Mind’ to have. However, Kitchen wanted to portray the message of what the illness does mentally and socially through the idea of colour palettes, and the sound design throughout which goes from loud and essentially messy, to isolated, to show the illness. The use of flashback and woods further portray the sense of being an outcast, and there again is a massive contrast of colours between the autumnal woods, and the dark counselling room. And the fragmented thoughts are shown through the fragmented clips. However as the viewer, there is a lack of character explanation of how the illness affects him, and what persuaded him to seek help after almost 10 years. As the short film progresses, the audience also is unsure of the backstory as to what role the woods play and why they are the only safe-haven to Jacob. However, the woods are automonal with dying trees and falling leaves as part of a gradual repetitive process, so perhaps that is a metaphor towards the patients never-ending reality. SHANE SMITH

VERDICT

This England meets Girl Interrupted, Disturbed Mind is intense, emotional and very engaging. 3*

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One comment

  1. Hi, Katie. I’ve jiggled your review around a bit and come up with an altered opening. This will need to be extended, however. Try to stay focussed on the film and its effect on the audience — remember, this is a review of the film, not the condition…

    Whether you have experienced it or not, Schizophrenia is real and affects one in a hundred people. Kitchen’s upcoming short film ‘Disturbed mind’ was created to convey the emotions and thoughts of a Schizophrenic patient. Kitchen’s fascination for the illness comes from her past experiences of dealing with this ailment. She speaks of helping a schizophrenic male who turned to alcohol and drugs as a coping mechanism, but despite trying to help, the man did not respond. From her experiences, she found that Schizophrenic persons are misunderstood, hence her reason for embarking on this ambitious filmmaking project.

    The story which unfolds is about a Paranoid Schizophrenic, Jacob (Jamie Jordan), who is controlled by the voices in his head. He confides in a psychiatrist (Emily Reeves), who stays more or less anonymous throughout the film.

    The opening to the film is affecting and intriguing. It starts with loud music, drinking, bright colours — everything you would not expect a film titled ‘Disturbed Mind’ to portray. However, Kitchen wanted to convey visually what the illness does mentally and socially. Through the use of colour palettes, and a sound design which goes from loud and essentially messy, to isolated, Kitchen evokes the suffering of a schizophrenic. The use of flashback and temporal editing further portray the sense of being an outcast.

    However the thing with paranoid Schizophrenia is that the illness can fool all of your senses and cause misperceptions. A common symptom of paranoid schizophrenia is the delusion of being watched.

    Liked by 1 person

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